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Santa Catalina Arch

Arco de Santa Catalina

Arco de Santa Catalina

Santa Catalina Arch (5th North Avenue, Antigua) – the Santa Catalina Arch is One of the distinguishable landmarks in Antigua, located on 5th Avenue North. Build in In the 17th century, it originally connected the convent of Santa Catalina with a school, specifically cloistered nuns to move from one building to another without leaving Street The activity of the earthquake in 1773 damaged the convent and the arch. Although partially restored, The convent was finally abandoned in 1776 and renovated in 1850. In the 1890s, more Renovations of this site resulted in the addition of a clock tower. When another the earthquake shook the city in 1976, the clock suffered some damage and was repaired years later (in 1991). Today, the arch is the most photographed attraction in the city, besides being a meeting place for the New Year holidays. Popenoe House (Scholastic Site, 6 East Street # 16, Antigua)

 

 

 


Tikal (ancient city)

Tikal

Tikal

Tikal (ancient city): the name of this unique city means “place of voices” and is one of the largest known Mayan cities so far. It has been a cultural and natural world World Heritage since 1979. This site has more than 3,000 archaeological sites. Elements, a city that exists between the pre-classic and classic periods. Of the temples and squares found here, highlights the Plaza Mayor, heart of Archaeological park of Tikal and is surrounded by temples I (Temple of the Great Jaguar) and II (Temple of the Masks), the Acropolis of the North and the Central. There is the square of the Great Pyramid or Lost World, a set of monuments of the The oldest in Tikal and the palace of the windows, with many interconnecting rooms. Temple III or “Temple of the Jaguar Priest” has different sizes in its lintels. the Temple IV or “Double-headed Snake Temple” is the tallest in Tikal, for its 70 meters high from where we can recreate one of the most spectacular Park panoramas. And temple VI or “Temple of the Inscriptions”, is named after the cover of glyphs on its crest.

 

 

 

 


Volcán de Agua (Antigua)

Volcán de Agua (Antigua)

Volcán de Agua (Antigua)

Volcan de Agua (Antigua) — this volcano looms over Antigua. Most tourists, enjoying
a latte in one of Antigua’s coffee shops, will think about hiking Volcan de Agua, but
never take that step. Don’t be that guy!
A word of warning: Volcan de Agua has a reputation for robberies on the hiking trail. To
climb this volcano, you should walk with an official guide/guard. Don’t let that dissuade
you. Volcan de Agua is an awesome feat and the view from the top is one of
Guatemala’s true gems.

Uaxactún

Uaxactún

Uaxactún

Uaxactún – located 24 km. outside of Tikal, Uaxactún is considered one of the oldest
cities in the Mayan Empire, dating from the pre-classic and classical periods. The
architectural evolution of the Mayan lowlands is evident, and one can find inscriptions
that date from 328 A.D. to 899 A.D. in different stone columns.
This Mayan city began to be rediscovered and studied from 1931 when the first formal
works were carried out by the Carnegie Institution of Washington. It received the name
of Uaxactún or “eight Stones” by Sylvanus Morley, the first investigator to arrive here,
crossing Nakúm, Naranjo and Yaxha. The word Uaxactún is composed of “Uaxac”,
which means eight and “Tun”, which means “stone”.

Sierra del Lacandon National Park

Parque Nacional Sierra del Lacandón

Parque Nacional Sierra del Lacandón

Sierra del Lacandon National Park — located in the northermost part of the country
(near Chiapas, Mexico) , this park has an extension of 95,529 hectares and was
declared a protected area in 1990. It’s one of the areas with the greatest diversity of
species in the world, consisting of over 870 species between plants and animals (such
as the red macaw and the jaguar) aiming to care for and protect these species through
preserving the habitat.

Semuc Champey

Semuc Champey

Semuc Champey

Semuc Champey — Semuc Champey is a section of the Cahabon River in the
rainforests of eastern Guatemala. The scenery is spectacular. A natural limestone
bridge crosses over a series of turquoise pools in the river descending from each other
in little waterfalls. The area offers great tubing and could be the most beautiful natural
water park in the world.
Semuc Champey also has its own network of caves you can explore by candlelight,
swimming through the system. If you love pristine pools, waterfalls, jungles, and
adventure, you will love Semuc Champey. This is one of the coolest places on the
planet, a true hidden gem.

Rio Dulce (river)

Río Dulce (río)

Río Dulce (río)

Rio Dulce (river) – this river, completely contained within the department of Izabal,
leads to the country’s Atlantic coast, and is proximate to neighboring countries Belize
and Honduras. It is part of a lake and river system that has become a popular cruising
sailboat destination. The river begins at the point where it flows out of Lake Izabal.
The Dulce River is located within the “Río Dulce National Park” area that protects the
Guatemalan ecosystem since 1955, containing a great diversity of fauna, among which
are manatees and crocodiles. To travel the 16 kilometers between the “Golfete” (small
gulf) and the ocean, the waters of the river enter through an enormous canyon that
separates the mountains where high walls of limestone rock with lush vegetation make
the journey an adventure. For a visit, it is recommended to use the water transportation
services available at the docks of Fronteras, El Relleno and Livingston.

Río Dulce (río)

Río Dulce (río)

Río Dulce (río)

Río Dulce (río): este río, completamente contenido dentro del departamento de Izabal,
conduce a la costa atlántica del país y está cerca de los países vecinos Belice
y Honduras Es parte de un sistema de lagos y ríos que se ha convertido en un crucero popular
Destino del velero. El río comienza en el punto donde fluye del lago Izabal.
El río Dulce está ubicado dentro del área del “Parque Nacional Río Dulce” que protege el
Ecosistema guatemalteco desde 1955, que contiene una gran diversidad de fauna, entre las cuales
son manatíes y cocodrilos. Recorrer los 16 kilómetros entre el “Golfete” (pequeño
golfo) y el océano, las aguas del río entran a través de un enorme cañón que
separa las montañas donde los altos muros de roca caliza con exuberante vegetación hacen
El viaje es una aventura. Para una visita, se recomienda utilizar el transporte acuático.
Servicios disponibles en los muelles de Fronteras, El Relleno y Livingston.

Pacaya (volcano)

Pacaya (volcán)

Pacaya (volcán)

Pacaya (volcano) – located an hour (46 km) south of the capital, this is an active
volcano that has erupted 26 times since the beginning of Spanish colonial rule in the
country. At a height of 2,552 meters, its attracts its share of international hikers and
other eco-tourists, due to its relative proximity to the capital and Antigua. In recent
years, the eruptions from this volcano have been minor (spewing only small amounts of
ash—just enough to make the rocks hot enough to toast marshmallows on).

Livingston

Livingston

Livingston

Livingston (town) — Livingston is home to the Garifuna, a mixed indigenous and
African people with their own food, language, and culture. Also here are English and
Creole-speaking people of West Indian descent. They mix it up with the Garifuna to
make a place unlike anywhere else in Guatemala.
Most people pass through Livingston without stopping. After all, this is where the boats
to/from Belize arrive/leave. But this town, with its vibe and access to wonderful beaches,
is worth sticking around in for a while.